Security Posts

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SaaS testing is the process of conducting a test case on an on-demand software or web-based software system. Software testing as a service is different from testing on-premises applications because SaaS-based application testing requires access to browsers and is centered around web application testing methods.

The software tests robust SaaS performance testing plans against real-world traffic in a cloud environment to confirm that the service is available, useful, and optimized for all web concurrent users at all times. By adhering to the best practices of SaaS testing, your team can quickly deploy updates and upgrades, increase ROI, and increase user satisfaction.

SaaS-Based Solutions: 4 Reasons to Testing

Reason 1. Smart scalability

The option to change software capabilities immediately upon request allows tenants to save costs on using cloud services. What's more, SaaS vendors use auto-scaling mechanisms that diagnose the amount of current users and adjust the software according to sizing needs.

Reason 2. Regular and rapid updates

Within the tight relationship with the SAS provider, the shortcomings and modifications of all solutions go through it. As a rule, the process of correcting errors and making changes is quick and frequent. Therefore, a robust QA strategy should be defined to optimize the snowfall of test scenarios on short notice.

Reason 3. Multi-tenancy

SaaS opportunities to use shared cloud resources make it affordable for a range of different organizations and streamline software support. Within the approach of providing access to multiple customers, each tenant's data is different and remains invisible to other subscribers. However, the sheer number of connections with a vendor can cause difficulties in compatibility and integration. In this case, improving the quality of the API may be the escape solution.

Reason 4. Adjustable architecture

One more reason why companies choose SaaS is the ability to customize and specify settings that perfectly match the needs of the business. And this requires thorough supervision, as improper operation of the IT solution can lead to defects after adding some modifications that can exacerbate the increased churning rate.

Therefore, in these specifications, SaaS testing is more complex than testing cloud and on-premises apps, which gathers more demand and a more in-depth attitude towards QA activities.

Now Let's see main points to get Upscale SaaS-Based Solutions

1. Functional testing

Testing all levels of connections between IT product components, including units, their integration and system testing, QA experts check the proper management of efficiency. Notably, the general requirements include numerous cases corresponding to casual user scenarios. Checking numerous configuration combinations makes testing more complete.

2. Performance testing

While on-premises applications are based on the user's environment, the customer experience in SaaS-based products may be influenced by others. Thus, performance checks are necessary - to run stress and load tests, QA engineers identify the above limitations of software capability and evaluate its behavior under the expected number of concomitant users.

3. Interoperability testing

SaaS based products perform flawlessly against various browsers and platforms as a prerequisite. Before conducting the interoperability test, the QA team estimates the most preferred browsers and platforms and isolates the browsers used by a few clients to exclude them. With every browser or platform tested, QA specialists cover the full scope of test configuration and provide seamless software operation for a wide range of users.

4. Usability testing

Intending to reduce churn rates and build long-term relationships with end users, companies primarily strive to enhance the customer experience with convenient app usage. By providing simple information architecture, simple workflow and interaction as well as visual readability and adequate feedback on commonly used functions, the individual can satisfy customers through a user-friendly application.

5. Security testing

Within sensitive data, SaaS-based solutions need to enable highly secure storage and disposal of information. Accepting casual accounts and roles, these applications require full validation of access control. To identify vulnerabilities and avoid data breaches, QA experts perform penetration testing, exploring potential barriers.

6. Compliance with requirements

Winning the competition also assumes meeting worldwide standards. Depending on the industry, HIPAA checklists for health products, OWASP security recommendations for any-domain web and mobile applications, GDPR to enable secure data storage and worldwide transfers and much more may be required to conduct software testing.

7. API testing

API testing is required between organizations delivering SaaS products, in conjunction with customer platforms and other third-party solutions. With it, instead of using default user inputs and outputs, QA engineers run positive and negative views of calls on APIs and analyze responses to system interactions. Such an approach allows in advance to ensure that the API application and the calling solution work properly. It focuses primarily on the business logic layer of software architecture.

8. Regression testing

Once the new functionality is implemented, it needs to be verified that the latest improvements have not affected the developed features. Being an elaborate and cumbersome process, the SaaS regression test includes all the test types mentioned above and a range of test cases involving more.

InfyOm has experience delivering comprehensive QA assistance with solid regression testing. Learn how our QA engineers tested and streamlined the software, ensuring the quality of the SaaS platform for public housing authorities.

Summary

Once you decide to build a true bug-free SaaS application, IT strategy needs to add SaaS testing to its specifications that include the use of Wise Cloud resources, prompt updates, multi-tenancy and customization.

By introducing QA tips from the InfyOm list, one can improve the quality of solutions, obtain the required business and operational values, and reduce churning rates.

October 21, 20212 minutesauthorBhumi Khimani
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In our previous tutorial, we had seen the most common security threats. Let's see Main Seven Tips and its Recommendations on How You Can Protect Yourself from These Threats are mention below.

1. Saved Login Credentials

It is recommended not to save credentials in the browser. Instead, use password managers like Password Safe and KeePass to store credentials.

Password managers work through a central master password and help you keep your website passwords secure.

You can also set the administrator to access a saved login or URL, depending on your convenience and security reasons.

2. Removable Browsing History

Deleting the browser cache is a way to remove risky information, especially when engaging in confidential activities such as online banking. This step can be performed manually in the browser or set to automatic when the browser is closed. Another way to stay protected from this threat is to use Incognito or Private Browsing mode, where no saves can be harvested.

3. Disable Cookies

The best solution to the threat of cookies is to disable them when using your browser.

However, it is not exceptional, as many websites rely on cookies and thus get limited access to their functionality once they are turned off.

Disabling cookies may also result in annoying prompts. Getting rid of cookies on a periodic basis can help you protect your browser, beware of duplicate information by websites as a side effect of it.

4. Reduce Browser Cache by using Incognito Mode

Protection from such threats can be achieved through incognito browsing as well as by manually clearing the cache as per the requirement, especially after a sensitive browser search.

5. Look for Standard Java Configuration

Java is a widely used language for running Windows and other operating system-related code. It is designed in such a way that the applets inside it run in a separate sandbox environment, which helps prevent them from accessing other operating system components and applications. But more often than not, these vulnerabilities allow small applications to escape from the sandbox environment and cause the threat.

To avoid Java-related threats, search and choose a standard Java security configuration that works best with your browser as well as PC and deploy these configurations through a key source such as Group Policy.

6. Third-Party Plugins or Extensions

Browsers often have third-party add-ons or extensions provided for various tasks, for example, JavaScript or Flash for viewing or working with content. These are both from well-known high-quality dealers, however, there are various modules and add-ons from less legitimate sources and may not, however, offer a business-related benefit. For this type of threat, it is recommended to only allow business-related plugins and extensions as a key aspect of the official business approach, for example, to use the Internet and email. Depending on the browser(s) used in your link, explore ways to whitelist unwanted plug-ins or appropriate plug-ins, so that only those plug-ins can be served. Security modules are arranged for automatic updating or submission of new forms by focused components, (for example, Active Directory Group Policy or System Center Configuration Manager).

7. Ads Popping up and Redirects

Pop-up ads are well-known malicious ads that can be particularly confusing and difficult to work with. They regularly give false notifications, for example, they confirm that PC you have an infection and encourage you to submit their antivirus to activate it. Usually, malware is the thing that really ends up happening. These popups are questionable to close because often there is no X to do it like this.

The best alternative is to close the program completely or use Task Manager in Windows / Execution direction in Linux to close the application.

That's it. If you want to harm-free system, take these tips and apply them to your Web-application. It will help to protect from security threats.

September 26, 20213 minutesauthorBhumi Khimani
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Web browser, is the most used application or portal for users to access the Internet. These browsers are very advanced, with improved usability and ubiquity. The individual is exposed to different internet browsers. Each of them consists of some perceived and real benefits. However, it is also true that none of them are safe from security threats. In fact, website browsers are more vulnerable to security vulnerabilities and when users interact with websites, they carry the possibilities of malware and other threats in them.

Mainly, 5 most common browser security threats and how to protect your system

With that in mind, here are some of the most common browser security threats and how to protect your system from them are follow below:

1. Removing Saved Login Credentials

Bookmarks associated with saved logins for linked sites is a terrible combination and doesn't really favor your system. When this is done, a hacker with little knowledge can hack it. There are some websites that use two-factor authentication, such as sending OTPs to your mobile phone to access them. However, many of them use this as a one-time access token so that a person can confirm his or her identity on the system they are intended to connect from. Deleting saved credentials is not good for your browser as well as for your system in general. Cybercriminals A can easily reset important identifiers and profiles on almost every website you visit. They can do this from anywhere and at any time. Once they have your IDs and passwords, they can run them from any system of their choice.

2. Permission to Browser History

Your browser's browsing history is a type of map or mechanism that keeps track of what you're doing and what sites you're visiting. It not only tells us which sites you visited, but for how long and when as well. If a criminal wants to get your credentials from the sites you access, they can do so easily, knowing which sites you have accessed through your browsing history.

3. Cookies

Cookies made up of locally stored files that identify association with certain files are another common browser security threat. Similar to browsing history, it can also track the site you visit and get credentials.

4. Browser Cache

Browser cache consists of storing sections of website pages which makes accessing and loading sites easier and faster, every time you visit. This can also identify the site or portal you have accessed and the content you have gone through. It also saves your location and device detection, making it a risky item as anyone can identify your location and device.

5. Autofill Information

Autofill information can pose a huge threat to your browser. Browsers like Chrome and Firefox store your address information, sometimes your profile information, and other personal information. But are you prepared if you fall into the wrong hands? Isn't it? Well, the criminal is now aware of and privacy to all your personal details.

In our next tutorial, will see Tips and Recommendations on How You Can Protect Yourself from These Threats.

August 09, 20212 minutesauthorBhumi Khimani